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Idea to Finish Part 5.2 - Animation Notes

As always. There were a lot. Have fun reading!  A new update will be up tomorrow.  SO much has changed.  For good reason!
Just for reference.  These notes come from a lot of colleagues in the industry.  I don't want to name them in the sense that, these people's voices are randomly being reposted.  So I rather keep it anonymous for now (unless they ask otherwise.)  I will say they all work in the industry as professional animators and have worked on some movies and games you've seen or played.  So they do know what they're talking about.  Also, I think it gives you guys an insight into what really people critique and look for.  Again it's skewed towards character animation, so do bare that in mind ;)

Shot 1:
  • The doggie run needs some work. A good way of dealing with runs Ive found is to hide the legs and just work on the spine, and really get it working. Get the nice accordion feel that dogs get when they run, then worry about the legs. It can prove challenging sometimes but I think the result is great whe using this layered approach for action sequences. (Im still getting used to it).
  • When the dog enters around f220, his head feels linear too. Adding a little of a tilt in the breakdown will help it out a lot. It's all in the breakdowns! You could have him slowly slide into frame for comedic effect, or a wild intro and a stop for a more ferocious puppy. Right now its a little vanilla, and the doggie doesnt seem too intense to be chasing his prey.
Shot 1a:
  • This is a nice take. Now you can go in and do little offsets and sweeten it up! Make one brow lead the other, while being led by the eyelids, etc. Little toe splays and perhaps an ear flick will add nice detail.
  • Around f44 Id push his compression a bit more for his big jump. Right hnow its all in the head, which makes sense since its so big and is probably what gives him the most potential energy, but if the body could help out it would heighten the pose and strenght of his action.
  • Right now the entire body takes off at the same time, too. Leave a foot behind on the tree trunk to let the head lead, so it wont feel like he if being pulled by something, :)
Shot 1b:
  • I shouldve mentioned this in blocking..but itd be nice if the squirrel's face could be in 3/4 every now and then. This is just personal preference and not a big note. ;]
  • On the dog, you have him squint around f30, anhd then go wide eyed around f46. I would reverse it, so he goes WHOA!... uh oh..he is mad....
  • The blink around 72 feels concious. By this I mean, it feels like the dog blinks on purpose. This is because of its speed. An involuntary blink should take around..4 frames, and it will give him an air of being nervous. The more he blinks, the more nervous he would be.
Shot 2
  • LOVE this. :D eyedart closeups are fun! You can have lotsa fun with some subtle hand anim too. KG!
  • On the closeup of the dog's eyes, she would like to see more confusion
  • The main thing she wanted to see pushed was his concerned look on the shot where you see the change in his thought process
Shot 3
  • At the beginning, the squirrel's hind leg feels a little swimmy, like its slipping over the dog's nose. This is a really nice shot, too. Near the end the dog nose is bouncing and it looks a bit off since nothing else is moving.
  • As an overall note, the lip sync feels a big soft on the jaw up down. I like to turn off all the other blends so I can just focus on the jaw flapping like a puppet, and really nail the rhythm of the dialogue. This really goes a long way and saves you some time up ahead. The next step is to nail the rhythm of the wides and narrows on the lip corners..and I tend to get away with just that rather than do really precise shapes. For me the rhythm and feeling of dialogue matters more than how nice an O shape looks (of course, having nice shapes is a plus, but its not what sells the talking).
Overall:
  • As an overall note, the lip sync feels a big soft on the jaw up down. I like to turn off all the other blends so I can just focus on the jaw flapping like a puppet, and really nail the rhythm of the dialogue. This really goes a long way and saves you some time up ahead. The next step is to nail the rhythm of the wides and narrows on the lip corners..and I tend to get away with just that rather than do really precise shapes. For me the rhythm and feeling of dialogue matters more than how nice an O shape looks (of course, having nice shapes is a plus, but its not what sells the talking).